The fake/false eyelash extensions I use in my beauty salon are made of Polybutylene Terephthalate (PBT) which is a type of synthetic polyester. It’s properties include that it is a very stable material and unlikely to shrink. Also it’s strong and very mould-able. They are heated and moulded into a tapered natural looking lash with different thicknesses and curls available to create individual looks to suit the client. It’s also a very stable product, low water absorbent and holds colour pigment well.

So even though many eyelash extensions are referred to as “mink” it’s the shape of the tapered lash not the material they are referencing to.

box of fake lashes

Can you get real mink eyelash extensions?

Yes you can. I personally don’t use them and never have. The mink are kept in small cages and I worry about animal cruelty. Also people are more likely to have allergic reactions to the fur. Even if the company/mink farm promises that the animals are kept well and looked after it’s very hard to know for sure, so I personally wouldn’t recommend them. They are available at some beauty salons though.

Is the eyelash extension glue safe?

It’s the same ingredients as they use in medical grade hospital glue to stick wounds together – Read more on eyelash glue on this blog post – eyelash extensions glue. People can have allergic reactions to this glue, so you should always have a test patch if you are going to have eyelash extensions professionally applied, if you are not offered one, demand one. Beauty insurance companies often don’t cover you for carrying out the treatment if you haven’t performed a test patch prior to applying fake lashes.

Over the last few years I have noticed more and more people are becoming conscious of what things are made of and asking more questions. This is great we should question things more and demand higher standards.

If you have anything to add on this subject or questions please feel free to comment below. I love getting feed back.